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Full Version: Nylon vs radial tires, myths debunked
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Hey guys, 
So I've seen on multiple bike and scooter channels, people talking about nylon tires as if they are bad, so I thought I'd make a quick post debunking some of the myths regarding nylon Vs radial tires.

Myth number 1: I've often seen people refering to the "rubber" part of the tire as being nylon, and this simply is not the case. The lining of the tire, the part the rubber is bonded to, the part of the tire designed to give it it's structural strength when properly pressurised is nylon, not the tire itself.

Myth number 2: all nylon tires are created equal right?: This is a myth i used to believe two years ago when I got my first scooter. You see , one of the most important things when buying tires for scooters and small bikes in general, isn't whether it's nylon lined or not, but it has more to do with the type of tread and the type of rubber used .Not all rubbers are created equal, and some are tackier than others, which results in better grip when going around a corner and in wet conditions. So your chinese tires from big boy (which admittedly I still use) might not fall apart from use, but they won't grip as well in wet conditions, increasing the likelihood of falling and the lack of "tackiness" also increases the time it takes to stop when slamming the brakes and increases the likelihood of skidding or hydroplaning in wet conditions. So yes, it is recommended to buy slightly pricier tires especially if you're new to bikes and scooters and you don't know what to do if you do skid or hydroplane.

Myth number 3: the overall lifespan of cheap and expensive tires are the same though right? 
Wrong again. Because of the better quality rubber often used in pricier tires, they often take longer to wear, and try often have better tread which helps especially in wet weather to channel the water away from the part of your tire in contact with the road again to prevent hydroplaning which is already dangerous when occuring to a car but even more so on a motorbike. So at the end of the day it comes down to this. If you ride very short distances in dry conditions your chinese tires can serve you well, bearing in mind that they may have a shorter lifespan overall, but if you ride in all weather conditions and longer distances, I'd definitely recommend looking at purchasing better tires next time you're due for a change.
Well analysed Matt1998.
I originally had MAXXIS on my scoot, and they performed poorly, and also split side to side across the tyre.

I also tried Kenda, which was quite as bit more expensive, but I did not feel I got my monies worth.

Now, the Michelin City Sprints, well priced for the longevity and performance, they have nice grip in the wet, and whenever I feel the rear tearing away, the behavour is predictable, so I always know how to get traction back,based on that predictability.
(10-11-2018, 03:54 PM)xsel777 Wrote: [ -> ]Well analysed Matt1998.
I originally had MAXXIS on my scoot, and they performed poorly, and also split side to side across the tyre.

I also tried Kenda, which was quite as bit more expensive, but I did not feel I got my monies worth.

Now, the Michelin City Sprints, well priced for the longevity and performance, they have nice grip in the wet, and whenever I feel the rear tearing away, the behavour is predictable, so I always know how to get traction back,based on that predictability.
Nice, I've only ever had two accidents on my scooter, one was my fault and one wasn't. The first I got rear ended because the guy behind me didn't know a red robot means stop and he was texting and driving. The next happened in extremely wet conditions, and I was going about 30 slowing down for a yield sign and suddenly I started hydroplaning, so I had to steer to the side to avoid a car, fortunately at that time I was only going about 15km/h so the only damage was a few scratches on the side and a broken handguard which was cheap and easy to fix. That was partially because I have stock tires and they tend to hydroplane a lot easier than more expensive ones which is why my next set will be proper brand named ones.